Category Archives: Vinyl

Beginner’s Guide to Choosing the Perfect Floor

wood floorsJust bought a new house? Is the flooring you picked out when you built your house finally ready to go? Or have you finally saved up enough to replace the last homeowner’s flooring mistake? If you’re a rookie to choosing the perfect floor, it’s wise to do your research. Choosing the perfect floor is not a small purchase, or something you want to screw up. On the flip side, choosing the perfect floor isn’t complicated—and it’s not something you have to do alone. Even a beginner (like yourself) can choose the perfect floor by asking a few simple questions:

  • Do I need to worry about water spills? An educated decision now can save you the headache of a warped floor later. Water can be your worst nightmare on laminate and wood floors, so a bit of planning now eliminates the hassle of replacement or repair. If you have a room where water may splash or form puddles, such as a bathroom, mudroom or kitchen, plan ahead. Consider vinyl plank flooring which has the look of wood, or any kind of tile floor which handles water like a pro. A room with the chance of a spill doesn’t mean you can’t get a wood floor—it just means being mindful of wiping up the water as soon as possible.
  • How much traffic comes through this room? Is the room a busy walk through? An area where your family plays, runs and tromps? Is it a room where your pet spends most of their time? Is the traffic that comes through full of mud, snow, sand and lord-knows-what-else? Use that knowledge to determine what kind of flooring would work in that particular area.
  • What kind of maintenance does the floor require? You don’t want to purchase a floor, have it installed and then end up with damage because you don’t care for, clean or vacuum it properly. Find out what kind of cleaning and maintenance the floor needs, what products you need to purchase to keep it in great shape—and realistically how much of that maintenance you can take on.
  • What is my budget? If you have a small area that needs carpeting—a small office, hallway or bedroom—consider purchasing a carpet remnant. Because there is a limited supply, a carpet remnant is discounted. Know the square footage of the room you need flooring for and the price you can afford per square foot. Factor that into your purchase decision.
  • What is under the new floor? Are you installing radiant floor heating under the flooring? Read our post about what kinds of flooring work over radiant floor heating. Are you installing this flooring over a concrete slab, like in a basement? Here’s information on what floors work in basements. Sometimes knowing what is under the floor is just as important as knowing what is going to be on top of it. Make sure you mention what’s under your floor to your sales professional when you get to step two of your flooring purchase.

If, even after asking all the questions, you still don’t have a clue about choosing the right flooring, or you’re trying to choose between two options, come into Y’s Way Flooring or ask us on our Facebook page. We can tell you what has worked for other Wisconsin homeowners and help you narrow the options in your budget. Best yet, we can help you choose the perfect flooring—and you don’t even have to tell anyone we helped.

5 Questions to Ask BEFORE You Buy Flooring

It’s easy to fall in love with flooring. We understand, we’ve done it (yes, we’ll admit it!). However, when you have to have that particular kind of flooring, or look, without giving a second thought to how well that flooring fits your home and traffic patterns, you’re just setting yourself up for buyer’s remorse. So we’re here to help you avoid that love-at-first-sight-buyers-remorse flooring purchase. The first step is to ask 5 simple questions:

  • Is there a chance of a water spill (or many spills) in this room? An educated decision now can save you the headache of a warped floor later. Water can be your worst nightmare on laminate and wood floors, so a bit of planning now eliminates the hassle of replacement or repair. If you have a room where water may splash or form puddles, such as a bathroom, mudroom or kitchen, plan ahead. Consider vinyl plank flooring which has the look of wood, or any kind of tile floor which handles water like a pro. A room with the chance of a spill doesn’t mean you can’t get a wood floor—it just means being mindful of wiping up the water as soon as possible.
  • What kind of traffic does this room get? Is it a busy walk through? An area where your family plays, runs and tromps? Is it a room where your pet spends most of their time? Is the traffic that comes through full of mud, snow, sand and lord-knows-what-else? Use that knowledge to determine what kind of flooring would work in that particular area.
  • What kind of maintenance does this type of flooring need? You don’t want to purchase a floor, have it installed and then end up with damage because you don’t care or clean it properly. Find out what kind of cleaning and maintenance the floor needs, what products you need to purchase to keep it in great shape—and realistically how much of that maintenance you can take on.
  • What is my budget? If you have a small area that needs carpeting—a small office, hallway or bedroom—consider purchasing a carpet remnant. Because there is a limited supply, a carpet remnant is discounted. Know the square footage of the room you need flooring for and the price you can afford per square foot. Factor that into your purchase decision.
  • What is under the flooring? Are you installing radiant floor heating under the flooring? Read our post about what kinds of flooring work over radiant floor heating. Are you installing this flooring over a concrete slab, like in a basement? Here’s information on what floors work in basements. Sometimes knowing what is under the floor is just as important as knowing what is going to be on top of it. Make sure you mention what’s under your floor to your sales professional when you get to step two of your flooring purchase.

The second step is to ask the professionals. Stop in at Y’s Way Flooring in Watertown, Oconomowoc, or Lake Mills and ask them the hard questions: what would you recommend? What have you seen work in local homes? What is the price? What is the cost of installation? Once you’re confident you have the ideal flooring that looks good and works in your home, ask for a quote and schedule installation. The last step is to enjoy your flooring, free of buyer’s remorse, and know you made a great flooring purchase decision that works and looks great.

5 Perfect Floors for Your Bathroom

Vinyl floors are just one option for your bathroom.

Vinyl floors are just one option for your bathroom.

If you fit into any of three categories: 1) you’ve made a New Year’s resolution to get rid of that old nasty bathroom flooring, 2) you have given up trying to clean the grooves of that old bathroom floor, or 3) your bathroom needs an inexpensive update to bring it into this era; then you’re on the hunt to find the perfect floor that is ideal for the unique challenges that come with bathroom flooring. Because of the moist environment, bathroom floors need to be mildew resistant and tough enough to handle water spills. Here are the top contenders ideal for your bathroom:

  • Tile. Ceramic or porcelain, doesn’t matter. Both kinds of tile are mildew resistant. They are also easy to clean and look beautiful. Ceramic and porcelain comes in virtually any color, and can be installed in a square or diagonal pattern.
  • Slate. Slate is a stone with a variety of colors and strengths. It also comes in large and small square tiles, and as long rectangular tiles for a modern look. Best yet, slate is durable and stain and water resistant, making it ideal for your bathroom.
  • Vinyl plank. Want the look of wood without the fear of a water spill? Vinyl plank flooring is your answer. With the durability, affordability and water resistance of vinyl, and the look of a wood floor (you can’t tell the difference!), vinyl plank flooring has a lot of benefits for any room in your house—including the bathroom.
  • Vinyl sheet. We would recommend vinyl sheet flooring in lieu of stick-on tiles. If water gets under vinyl stick on tiles, mold can form. Vinyl sheet flooring is water resistant, extremely affordable and durable. In addition, vinyl sheet flooring comes in almost any shape and color, and can mimic tile flooring so closely you almost can’t tell (until you touch it).
  • Radiant floor heating. We know radiant floor heating is not technically a type of flooring, but radiant floor heating is ideal for Midwestern homes. Radiant floor heating keeps your feet warm, and can be installed under almost any kind of flooring. If you want tile floors that are warm in summer and through our cold Wisconsin winters, radiant floor heating is right for you.

When you are ready to purchase your bathroom flooring, or if you have any questions, stop in at one of our Y’s Way Flooring locations in Watertown, Oconomowoc or Lake Mills, email us your questions or ask us your questions on our Facebook page. We’ll help get you set up with new flooring that’s perfect for your bathroom and lifestyle.

The BEST Floor for Your Kitchen

What's the best floor for your kitchen?

What’s the best floor for your kitchen?

The kitchen is the heart of the home—and better be, if you want to eat. Even if microwave cooking is more your chef style, with today’s open home designs, your kitchen needs to look like the heart of your home.

Start with your flooring. Why? It covers a majority of the surface area, is a major part of your kitchen design and it’s important. Whether you have kids running through, dogs begging at your feet or a spouse sneaking late night snacks, you need a durable, beautiful floor that can withstand continual traffic, food spills and puddles. The good news: you have a lot of options that fit the criteria. The bad news: there are a lot of options.

Wood flooring

Pros: Beautiful, durable, easy-to-clean, long lasting. We’ve all seen century-old hardwood floors that held up through the ages. With a variety of finishes, wood flooring is stunning and easy to clean.

Cons: Water & scratching. If you’re a messy cook or dishwasher, think twice. Any sitting water on hardwood flooring can cause damage and staining. Have a high traffic home with kids or pets (or both)? Consider hand-scraped hardwood flooring, which hides the dings and scratches that come with busy households.

Tile

Pros: Beautiful, durable, easy-to-clean, loves radiant floor heating. Available in almost any color, tile is a beautiful option just begging for radiant floor heating. Easy to clean, tile flooring requires only a daily sweeping and an occasional mopping. You don’t have to worry about standing water with tile flooring, as most tile floors are mildew and water resistant.

Cons: Cold without radiant floor heating, hard to stand on, can be prone to dings. Many kinds of tile can take anything you throw at it—except your dishes. Because of the hardness of tile, any plates or cups dropped on the floor are prone to shattering. The hardness can also be hard to stand on for long periods of time, and tile can feel cold to the feet without radiant floor heating.

Laminate

Pros: Tons of options, durable, easy-to-clean. The days of your grandmother’s boring laminate flooring is gone, replaced by laminate flooring in almost any color that can fool your visitors. While laminate flooring may look like wood, laminate flooring is tougher while still boasting the easy-to-clean quality of a wood floor.

Cons: Water & scratching. Homeowners with laminate floors have to be on the watch for water; any standing water can warp laminate floors. Laminate floors are tough but can scratch, leaving visible damage on the floors.

Vinyl

Pros: Indestructible, beautiful, tolerates water well. Vinyl floors can take standing water without any problem—even if you have a foot of flooding in your kitchen. Today’s vinyl floors have the look of stone, wood, any look you would want.

Cons: Scratching & glue. Vinyl floors can be scratched, leaving your floor with visible damage. Do your research when shopping for vinyl floors; there are many different quality levels of vinyl flooring. Vinyl floors also are glued down, making it a long-term flooring solution that is difficult to change frequently if you tire of your flooring.

So what’s the BEST floor for your kitchen? The answer is different for every home. Do your research, and talk to your local experts for flooring recommendations that have worked in local homes. If your kitchen has an exterior door, take that into account when selecting your flooring, or find a rug that won’t damage the floor.  Looking for the warm benefits of radiant floor heating? Tell your sales associate so they can show you flooring that works with radiant flooring. If you are still undecided about what is the best option for your family, visit your local flooring experts and talk to your friends and family.  Find out what flooring they would (or wouldn’t) recommend for one of the most important rooms in your home.

Your (Easy) Guide to Basement Flooring

Kids_carpetWith winter fast approaching, many Midwestern homeowners are looking for more space; more space for fun and relaxing during those cold winter days or for guests or kids who want their own bedroom. The answer for many homeowners lies in a finished basement with shelving and storage options, finished walls, lighting and comfortable, durable flooring. When researching flooring options for your basement, the discussion should always start with the factor that dictates basement flooring decisions: moisture.

If your basement is like most American homes, your basement walls and floor is concrete. Though durable and affordable, concrete is porous, allowing moisture to seep through the floor and walls. If your moisture problem extends beyond your porous concrete slab and is a reoccurring flooding issue, rectify your flooding problem before finishing your basement to avoid losing furniture and costly clean-ups.

One flooring not recommended for basements is solid wood flooring. Don’t fret; there are other options with the look of wood, without the buckling and warping that can occur because of moisture in a basement. Engineered hardwood and laminate both can be installed in basements without the warping. Both flooring options are durable and beautiful but should be avoided in basements prone to flooding.

Vinyl also has the look of wood, stone or any other modern design and is durable enough to handle moisture—even flooding—in a basement. Typically glued down, vinyl is nearly indestructible and is ideal for basements where the threat of flooding is never completely gone.

Ceramic flooring can be laid directly over your basement slab and comes in almost any look you want. Typically, ceramic tiles are better for rooms with moderate traffic due to durability, but if your basement rec room or bedroom is used infrequently, this is your flooring. Ceramic tiles can also be cold to the feet, but is one of the ideal floors for laying over radiant floor heating.

If you want a softer feel in one of the typically coolest rooms in your home, carpet is affordable, durable and comfortable. Want to avoid carpet installation costs? Consider carpet tiles which are easy to clean up, but not as soft as traditional carpeting. Traditional carpeting is installed over a pad, making it cushy and making you forget you are on top of a concrete slab. If you have a small basement, inquire about carpet remnants. Though the selection is limited, carpet remnants cost less and are ideal for small spaces.

Want to see your options? Visit your local flooring store. Be sure that your salesperson knows you are researching flooring for your basement; they can recommend flooring that they have seen work well in local homes. They can also give you an idea about pricing, since the cost varies based on your selection. Start your research now, so you have that extra space ready when the snow falls and cabin fever sets in.

Best Flooring for your Mudroom

vinyl floor10 pounds. At least.

That’s how much sand we’ve been trying to keep out of our house because of our kids’ obsession with the sandbox. And that’s why we’re so grateful for our mudroom, which keeps the pool water, wet paws, grass clippings and, well, mud off of our hardwood flooring. It also stores and organizes all the gear, sports equipment and leashes that come with a busy family.

So what’s the best flooring for your mudroom? We’ll start with what’s not the best option. Hardwood flooring, though extremely durable and beautiful, is not the best fit for a mudroom. Any water (or snow) left on hardwood flooring can lead to damage and warping.

That leaves you with a few other excellent choices:

  • Porcelain tile. It looks great. But that’s not the reason porcelain tile is an ideal candidate for your mudroom or entry way. Porcelain tile is water, odor and mildew resistant. If you’re worried about the cold feeling of this tile, you can install radiant heating underneath and enjoy toasty toes even on the coldest Wisconsin days.
  • Linoleum. This flooring is budget friendly and easy to clean, perfect for any mudroom. It comes in a variety of patterns and colors, making it easy to clean and easy on the eyes.
  • Vinyl. Some of the newest vinyl products could fool even the most hard-core hardwood admirer. Whether your preference is stone or hardwood, these tiles can mimic both styles with colors that floor everyone who enters your home. Vinyl is also durable and soil and stain resistant, perfect for the room that takes the brunt of the elements on a regular basis.

We can’t keep the sand out of your mudroom, but we can install flooring that can handle the sand, snow, mud and anything else that tracks into your home. Stop in or contact us for your perfect mudroom flooring match.