Ways to Stay Ahead of Your Home’s Indoor Allergens

woman with kleenex dealing with indoor allergiesIndoor allergies. You don’t want people avoiding your home because a simple visit makes them sneeze (and wheeze and deal with a runny nose and…). You certainly don’t want to live in a home that brings out your worst allergy symptoms. The good news is you don’t have to (and you can make sure that your guests don’t experience indoor allergy symptoms in your house either) if you follow these tips that keep you ahead of the allergens that invade your home.

Vacuum, vacuum, vacuum.

Whether you have carpet or hard floor, a regular vacuuming can remove the allergens from your home especially if you have the right vacuum cleaner. Choose a vacuum with a HEPA filter or a double bag to ensure that you can contain the allergens (other tips for choosing the right vacuum here). If you experience any symptoms while vacuuming, try wearing a mask so you can rid your home of allergens without having an allergy attack.

Deep clean your carpets.

To completely remove allergens, take the next step. Schedule a professional carpet cleaning to remove all the allergens that could get trapped deep in the carpet fibers. A professional carpet cleaning not only removes visible stains but also gets the allergens that trigger your allergies.

Have your ducts cleaned.

When the temperatures drop, we spend more and more time indoors. As we sit in our home, indoor allergens like dust mites, pet dander, and mold circulate in the air around us every time the furnace or air conditioner runs. To get the indoor allergies out of your air and your home, schedule a professional duct cleaning that can remove the allergens from your vents.

Get a better furnace filter.

Allergens enter your home on your clothes every day (including pet dander, which has been found even in pet-free homes). Furnace filters are your next line of defense; furnace filters catch allergens that circulate through your HVAC system every day—if you use a furnace filter with a strong Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV). Filters with a high Minimum Efficiency Reporting Values (MERV) do not allow finer particles to pass, effectively removing allergens from the air. Be careful about buying a filter with a high MERV though; filters with high MERVs (the max is 16) can put too much pressure on your furnace fan and possibly damage your furnace. If you are considering a filter with a high MERV, make sure to consult a HVAC technician to make adjustments that can accommodate a high MERV filter.

Monitor your home’s humidity.

An excessive air moisture level in your home can breed mold, mildew, and dust mites. Keep an eye on your home’s humidity level with a monitor. If the moisture level is high, use dehumidifiers to keep the humidity level below 50 percent—and keep indoor allergens at bay.

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